Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Introducing the Oxford Research Encyclopedias

"The Oxford Research Encyclopedias offer long-form overview articles written and edited by leading scholars and researchers, addressing both foundational and cutting-edge topics across the major disciplines. Oxford University Press is developing this program in response to a growing need for reliable information to be used at the start of serious research on an unfamiliar topic."  Now available for American History, Latin American History, and Religion.  



 

September Content Update from CREDO

There were four new titles released to Academic Core in September 2016.
New Academic Core Titles: 
 
ISBN: 9781848666672
50 Chemistry Ideas You Really Need to Know is an engaging guide to the world of chemistry. From the molecules that kick-started life itself to nanotechnology, chemistry offers some fascinating insights into our origins, as well as continuing to revolutionize life as we know it.
 
ISBN: 9780313343957
Eight years in the making, "Latin Music: Musicians, Genres, and Themes" is the definitive work on the topic, providing an unparalleled resource for students and scholars of music, Latino culture, Hispanic civilization, popular culture, and Latin American countries. Comprising work from nearly 50 contributors from Spain, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States, this two-volume work showcases how Latin music-regardless of its specific form or cultural origins-is the passionate expression of a people in constant dialogue with the world.The entries in this expansive encyclopedia range over topics as diverse as musical instruments, record cover art, festivals and celebrations, the institution of slavery, feminism, and patriotism. The music, traditions, and history of more than two dozen countries-such as Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Spain, and Venezuela-are detailed, allowing readers to see past common stereotypes and appreciate the many different forms of this broadly defined art form.
 
ISBN: 9781558628588
Throughout history, literary works of all kinds have been used to spread propaganda and influence public opinion for or against one cause or another. The Literature of Propaganda examines these literary works and explores ways in which propaganda shapes public opinion, persuades its audience, and impacts society.
 
ISBN: 9780826196736
The book critically examines research from cognitive, social, developmental, biological, and evolutionary approaches to psychology and addresses the interplay between media consumption and viewer behavior in such realms as advertising, body image, sex, and violence. Distinguished by its examination of research from a scientifically objective position, the book offers students not only current knowledge of media psychology but also the tools to challenge commonly held assumptions from popular advocacy and ideology.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Banned Books Week


The library will be commemorating Banned Books Week  the week of September 25-October 1.  Stop by to see  Amanda's amazing display and watch for her posts about the event on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram




 Find out why this commemoration is so important from the American Libraries Banned Books Week page.

Get a list of the top ten most challenged books in 2015 here.


Register to Vote in the Library


We will be hosting our first voter information/registration event on Friday, September 16, from 8 am - noon.  

We will have a table with  pertinent information and someone on hand to answer basic questions and help with registration.  

We will have paper registration forms and computers set aside if you'd prefer to register online.  

We'll be hosting a second event on Tuesday, October 4 from 1 - 5 pm.  

In the meantime, our Reference Librarian, Ruth Ann has put together a helpful guide to the 2016 election.  Check out the guide here: Election Library Guide.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Voting, Hobbits, Fall, and BBW

You might be wondering what voting, hobbits, fall, and Banned Books Week all have in common - they're all events happening at the Fitzgerald Library this September.

We will be hosting our first voter information/registration event on Friday, September 16, from 8am - noon.  We will have a table with  pertinent information and someone on hand to answer basic questions and help with registration.  We will have paper registration forms and computers set aside if you'd prefer to register online.  We'll be hosting a second event on Tuesday, October 4 from 1 - 5pm.  In the meantime, our Reference Librarian, Ruth Ann has put together a helpful guide to the 2016 election.  Check out the guide here: Election Library Guide

The following week is Tolkien Week (here's where the hobbits come in);  J.R.R. Tolkien is one of my all-time favorite authors and we're going to celebrate his life and contributions to literature the week of September 18-24.  During Tolkien Week , we'll also celebrate the first day of autumn, September 22, which is also the birthday of Bilbo and Frodo.

The last week of September we'll raise awareness about censorship with a celebration of Banned Books Week.   The Fitzgerald Library will have displays and information on why books gets challenged and sometimes subsequently banned.  There will be great interactive elements (keep a watch on our social media platforms), as well as a drawing to win an "I read banned books" tote and a mug.  Some pretty sweet swag if I do say so myself.

Here's to an event-packed September, we'll see you around.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Welcome Back!

We worked on a lot of projects here at the Fitzgerald Library this past summer. 

In June we undertook an inventory of our entire collection, 150,000+ items, which took about a month to complete.  Inventory allows us to make sure each item is accounted and in its proper place.  We won’t be doing it again until 2018.  Whoosh! 

New lower level seating area.

Andy, our Evening Circulation Supervisor, started a huge project to shift and reorganize our Archives collection this summer. We hope to show off some of our collection later this fall; October is American Archives Month.  We’ve still got quite a bit of work to do downstairs but we made huge progress. 

We’ve also been receiving, sorting, and adding donations to our collection.  As of today, August 30, the library has received +1500 items, more than the total donated ALL of last year!

The library has also undergone some tech upgrades over the summer.  All of the library computers were upgraded to Windows 10.  On the upper and lower levels, we replaced our stand-up catalog stations with iPad stands. 
New upper level seating area.

Since our last student survey we’ve been working to create more comfortable seating areas in the library, which was one of our most frequent requests.  This past summer we added two new seating areas, you’ll find one of them on the upper level and one downstairs in the lower level.  We’ve also changed up the study space on the main level of the library.  We moved one of the large study tables up against the window, which allows for better light (we’ve also added a lamp for nighttime use) and closer proximity to a power outlet, we’ve also run a power cord under the table for more plug-ins.  In addition, we've added a charging station for your devices at the same table.


Let us know what you think of the changes.  We had a busy summer and hope you did too!  

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

MLA Citation Changes

The eighth edition of the MLA Handbook (Modern Language Association) was released this summer and with it comes changes to the the way citations for the Works Cited lists are formatted.  The idea is to make citing sources from a variety of sources easier.  The new Handbook, according to the associate director and director of scholarly communication for the MLA, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, "focuses on  principles--not just on how to create a citation that is correct, but on the purpose of the citation practice, as well as evaluating sources. As Fitzpatrick explains it the new citation style shifts the focus from the publication format to the "elements that are common to nearly all sources."

Visit the new MLA Style Center for a range of helpful guides and tips.

The library has copies of the new Handbook at the Reference Desk, the Circulation Desk, and in the General Collection for your perusal.  Librarians will be on hand to answer any questions you may have.  As always check with your professors to see what your Works Cited lists should look like.